Breastfeeding Facts and Trivia Tips

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Appetite Spurts

During growth spurts you can expect your baby's nursing to increase. This could mean an increase in the number of feedings per day or the amount of time the baby nurses to increase. Many times babies go through growth cycles at around two weeks, around one and a half months, three months, six months and so on. Take note of when your baby becomes more demanding for milk and they will likely be about to grow.

   

Importance of Burping

Although breastfeeding, as opposed to bottle feeding, usually means babies take in less air, they still need to be burped. Not burping after nursing can give babies uncomfortable gas pains and make them fussy. Some babies find it easier than others and some must vary positions. The most common position is holding the baby over your shoulder and gently patting her on the back. If this doesn't work you can sit her up on your lap, using one hand to support her chest and head from the front and the other to gently pat her back. You can also try holding the baby laying down across your lap. After burpring, she may want to nurse more, as she realizes that her tummy was filled with more than just milk.

   

Easy Positioning of Baby

The most common holds are straight across your abdomen/chest and the football hold. When holding the baby straight across your chest. The baby should be on his or her side, with their bodies, ears and shoulders making a straight line across your chest. This position is good for bonding at the child can most easily look up at their mother as they nurse. The football hold has the child nursing on the outer breast while their body is resting like a football, mostly under the mother's arm.This position allows the mother to nurse two children at once, very efficient and helpful for mothers of twins or other multiples.

   

Proper Latching

If you are having pain while nursing (although discomfort as you get used to nursing in the very beginning is very common) or hear oddly loud sucking noises as you nurse, your baby is probably not latched on properly. Your baby most likely is not all the way latched on. If he or she is latched on properly, their bottom lip will be all the way out and cover most of the bottom of the areola. The top lip should also be completely visible, not tucked into the mouth at all. If you do not see their lips, you must adjust the latch. By gently pulling down on the bottom lip you can usually pull it out just enough to correct the latching. If not, or you need to fix the top lip, you will most likely have to break the suction first. To break the suction, slowly insert your pinky finger into the baby's mouth until the suction breaks. If you just pull out the breast before breaking suction you can hurt yourself or the baby. Once your baby is used to latching on right he or she will do it instinctively.

   
Does breastmilk cure pinkeye?

Breastmilk, not just for breakfast anymore!

Does your baby (or any of your children) have pinkeye (conjunctivitis)? A small amount of breastmilk applied to the affected area can actually relieve and treat some common eye irritations.

   

Proper Latching

If you are having pain while nursing (although discomfort as you get used to nursing in the very beginning is very common) or hear oddly loud sucking noises as you nurse, your baby is probably not latched on properly. Your baby most likely is not all the way latched on. If he or she is latched on properly, their bottom lip will be all the way out and cover most of the bottom of the areola. The top lip should also be completely visible, not tucked into the mouth at all. If you do not see their lips, you must adjust the latch. By gently pulling down on the bottom lip you can usually pull it out just enough to correct the latching. If not, or you need to fix the top lip, you will most likely have to break the suction first. To break the suction, slowly insert your pinky finger into the baby's mouth until the suction breaks. If you just pull out the breast before breaking suction you can hurt yourself or the baby. Once your baby is used to latching on right he or she will do it instinctively.

   
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